Finance

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

American Express – The financial services giant earned $2.08 per share for the third quarter, 5 cents a share above estimates. Revenue also came in above analysts’ forecast. American Express also forecast current-quarter revenue growth of 8% to 10%, compared to a consensus estimate of 8.9%.

Coca-Cola – The beverage maker reported adjusted quarterly profit of 56 cents per share, in line with forecasts. Revenue was higher than expected. Coca-Cola also reported organic sales growth of 5%, beating forecasts, and also raised its full-year guidance for revenue and operating income.

Schlumberger – The oilfield services company beat forecasts by 3 cents with adjusted quarterly profit of 43 cents per share. Revenue also came in above analysts’ forecasts amid strong international growth.

E*Trade Financial – E*Trade reported quarterly earnings of $1.08 per share, 7 cents a share above estimates. The brokerage firm’s revenue also beat Wall Street forecasts. The company said it would move to take more market share in the new zero commission environment.

Intuitive Surgical – Intuitive Surgical reported adjusted quarterly profit of $3.43 per share, beating the consensus estimate of $2.99 per share. The maker of robotic surgical devices also saw revenue beat estimates, with procedures involving its flagship Da Vinci growing nearly 20% from a year earlier.

General Motors – GM workers will remain on the picket lines until a ratification vote is complete. GM and the United Auto Workers union announced a tentative labor agreement earlier this week.

InterContinental Hotels Group – The hotel operator reported a 0.8% decline in the key metric of revenue per available room during the third quarter. The Holiday Inn and Crowne Plaza owner’s business was impacted by the Hong Kong protests, among other factors.

PG&E – PG&E noteholders and wildfire victims have filed their own bankruptcy reorganization plan, following a decision by a judge earlier this month that stripped the utility of its exclusive right to formulate a bankruptcy plan. The proposal would give the noteholders and victims effectively all of the new shares to be issued in the utility.

Charles Schwab – The brokerage firm plans to allow investors to buy and sell fractional shares. Founder and Chairman Charles Schwab told The Wall Street Journal that this move and others are designed to attract younger clients.

Anheuser-Busch – The beer brewer filed suit against rival Molson Coors, accusing it of stealing secret beer recipes for Bud Light and Michelob Ultra.

AT&T – AT&T is in talks with Elliott Management to resolve the activist investor’s campaign for change at the company, according to people familiar with the matter who spoke to The Wall Street Journal.

Tesla – Tesla will charge a non-refundable $100 fee for any orders placed for its cars. Previously, Tesla had required refundable $1,000 reservation fees and $2,500 order deposits.

Stitch Fix – The clothing styling service was rated “outperform” in new coverage at Telsey Advisory Group, with the firm pointing to Stitch Fix’s strength as both an apparel retailer and a technology company.

WD-40 – The lubricant maker reported quarterly earnings of 63 cents per share, a penny a share above estimates. Revenue also scored a slight beat, however the company gave a weaker-than-expected outlook.

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